Penelope Stuart Bourk's work is inspired by myth. Her essays appear in journals, newspapers, and books. Her sculptures and presentations are incorporated into leadership programs and exhibits at conference centers, universities, schools, and churches in the Pacific Northwest. Spirit Caves explores the sacred feminine. Empty Nest considers transitions in aging. Weaving Odysseus Home, a 20-sculpture series in wood, bone, and fiber, draws on Homer’s Odyssey to create imaginal “islands of experience” juxtaposing images of venturing and abiding, transgression and transformation, war and reconciliation. View her work at penelopestuartbourk.com.


Crossing Hecate Strait

I am one of the four travelers. I grew up in Vancouver, B.C., and for decades I harbored the dream that one day I would visit the Queen Charlottes. I smile to recall how, on a snowy day late in 2010, in a hot tub with three naked women I had recently met on Whidbey Island in Washington State’s Puget Sound, the conversation turned to unfulfilled dreams. I shared my dream, held since fifth grade, when I stumbled upon the work of the amazing, curious, famous–unknown Canadian painter and writer, Emily Carr...

Winter 2013 Issue

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The Untended Path

The labyrinth serves as a symbol of life’s journey, a medium for shamanic inquiries, a metaphor for spiritual pilgrimage, a prescribed walk for meditation, an intriguing path for the eye on jewelry and fabric. I am often struck by its efficiency, how many steps in such a small area, how short a time a journey can take, and the unfailing invitation to presence.

Winter 2013 Issue

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A Postscript
Antique Oddity to Welcomed Ambassador

Traveling through China in October 2012, I was repeatedly approached. A multigenerational Tibetan family in colorful dress surrounded me at the exhibit of the ancient 10,000 warriors in Xi’an. Pleading in a language I could not understand, but gesturing with such eager trusting faces as they passed their smiling bundled baby toward me for a cheek-to-cheek photograph, they managed to convey their “Please.” How could I resist?

Winter 2013 Issue

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